5. Up.

Oh you deceiving poster.
Oh you deceiving poster.

While technically being a movie about adventure, Up’s 15 minute opening scene had everyone in pieces; and tears. It’s incredible what the creators managed to accomplish with a fifteen minute scene, bordering on sheer genius.

4. Her.

Beautiful, transcendent love.
Beautiful, transcendent love.

If it were not for its rather tragic end, Her could almost be classified as a happy love story. The director however, wanted to give audiences a movie that would sweetly haunt them in their dreams. And that is precisely what we have here. Her tells the story of a man who falls in love with a computer AI, voiced expertly by Scarlett Johanson. and how this unique relationship changes and molds his life. Attachment to both leads comes very naturally due to the expert direction by Spike Jonze, an end to this attachment coming rather tragically and unexpectedly, which is what makes this movie all the more heartbreaking.

3. Blue is the warmest Color.

Poignant, sad and beautiful.
Poignant, sad and beautiful.

Blue is the warmest color is a masterpiece in that it tells the coming-of-age story a young girl with such panache, you get invested in the story from the moment the director pans to the first sequence. It’s a story that enmeshes itself in confusion, panic, struggle and most importantly, love. Poignant and sadly beautiful, Blue is the Warmest Color is a must see.

2. Brokeback Mountain.

Ironically, opposites attract.
Ironically, opposites attract.

Ang Lee’s melancholic masterpiece tells the story of two young men who find love one beautiful summer, and struggle to repossess it as they play the dual game of growing older and staying young. Played with subtle finesse by Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhal, Brokeback Mountain is a sad story of wondrous love, prickly life and terrible heartache.

1. Never Let Me Go.

In the interest of self-preservation,we are never watching this again.
In the interest of self-preservation,we are never watching this again.

Never Let Me Go is probably the most heartbreaking movie you’ll ever see. It blends themes of loneliness, separation, dystopias and tender joy into a 2 hour runtime and most importantly, doesn’t let these intractable themes get in the way of the narrative, which tells the survival story of three young loves in a world fueled by selfishness and misery. The film’s ending, while depressing to the core, offers a glimmer of hope that only makes the pain worse. Terrifying, unforgiving and bleakly nostalgic, Never Let Me Go truly isn’t for the faint of heart.