Sometimes you don’t need high adrenaline. Sometimes you dont need spine chilling thrillers. Sometimes you just need to get on that couch with your loved one and cuddle up to watch some vivid range of powerful emotions on screen. For those times, we at Crizic have just the perfect list for you. Here are the 8 best romantic movies in Hollywood.

8. Annie Hall

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Annie Hall is the sole best picture winner in Woody Allen’s canon. The film is also one of the best romantic comedies ever, simply because it takes the time to show all of the moments that happen in a relationship—the wide spectrum of happy and sad, of bittersweet and just plain bitter. From fighting over which movie to see, to laughing while chasing down lobsters in the kitchen, Allen perfectly encapsulates the delicate beauty found in the highs and lows of a relationship. It doesn’t hurt that his wit and humor is perfectly matched by Diane Keaton, in her iconic, Oscar-winning performance. Funny with a perceptively intellectual undercurrent, Annie Hall is an enduring classic.

7. Wall-E

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Can a near-silent portrait of a love between two robots, WALL-E and Eve, really be that romantic? Well, Pixar found a way with this daring story of a lonely robot on Earth in 2700, a time when the planet has been abandoned by life and WALL-E has only piles of junk and a copy of Gene Kelly’s ‘Hello, Dolly!’ for company. WALL-E is a creaky, awkward creature and when the more sleek, iPod-like Eve turns up in his life, he naturally falls head over heels for her. The film’s great achievement (if we forget its more boisterous and less successful second half) is that its silence and calm draw us in and allows us to appreciate small gestures and the little things in life. It’s the most touching robot-on-robot relationship since the bickering bromance between C3PO and R2D2 in ‘Star Wars’.

6. When Harry Met Sally

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Easily the most beloved romantic comedy of the ‘80s, the story of Harry (Billy Crystal), Sally (Meg Ryan) and their 12-year journey to couple-hood boasts a solid script by Nora Ephron that feeds and feeds off of the unexpected chemistry between its leads. (And with each new generation of lovers watching the diner scene for the first time, another woman laughs and another man sits silently, wondering what’s so funny.)

5. Up

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Can an animated movie make it to the list of greatest romantic movies ever? Well, you should have asked this question before Up was released. So far, no animated movie (Except, of course, Wall-E) has captured emotions in lifeless graphics so beautifully.

4. Casablanca

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Where to begin? There’s the great cast: Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Paul Henreid, Claude Rains, Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre. And the great moment: nervous, nervy locals silencing Nazi officers with a passionate rendition of “La Marseillaise.” And the great song: Dooley Wilson singing Herman Hupfeld’s “As Time Goes By.” There are the immortal lines: “Here’s looking at you, kid,” and “Of all the gin joints in all the towns in all the world she walks into mine,” and “We’ll always have Paris.” And the swift, punch-the-studio-time-clock transcendence of director Michael Curtiz. And the shocks of North African sun, of searchlights and moonlight in the night, courtesy of cinematographer Arthur Edeson. And there’s the last scene, blanketed in gray-velvet fog, in which a skein of glances looms the most powerful triangle in cinematic history. Bogart-Bergman-Henreid. But more than that: love-war-duty.

3. Eternal sunshine of the spotless mind

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Michel Gondry’s debut feature, Human Nature, was a whimsical dud, but his follow-up suggested a mature, disciplined director with his playful side intact. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mindtraffics in his signature sleights of hand, which serve two touching and tragic love stories: between red-haired Kate Winslet and a supremely sad Jim Carrey, and between headstrong Kirsten Dunst and a pining Mark Ruffalo. All of their performances—including Gondry’s—stay in your memory long after the credits have rolled

2. Brief Encounter

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Critics love to pick at Lean and Coward’s oh-so-polite study of English romanticism and repression, but frankly its their loss: those willing to give themselves over to its intense mood of swooning, tightlipped desperation will find themselves swept up in one of the most vivid and impassioned doomed romances ever committed to celluloid. Note-perfect acting and indelible location photography add to what is, in emotional terms at least, arguably the great director’s finest hour.

 

1. Gone with the wind

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Why should we still give a damn? Because after more than 70 years, ‘Gone with the Wind’ still does it bigger and better. At nearly four hours long it’s the ultimate rainy-day-in-bed-with-the-flu movie and features maybe the greatest ever screen lovers. Every actress in Hollywood was screen-tested or considered for the role of spoiled Southern belle Scarlett O’Hara. In the end, it went to the hardly-known British actress Leigh, with Gable cast as infamous ladies’ man Rhett Butler.

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