[dropcap size=small]C[/dropcap]rizic brings to you list of 10 best science websites.

10. ScienceDirect

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ScienceDirect is a website operated by the Anglo-Dutch publisher Elsevier. It was launched in March 1997. It is a platform for access to nearly 2,500 academic journals and over 26,000 e-books. The journals are grouped into four main sections: Physical Sciences and Engineering, Life Sciences, Health Sciences, and Social Sciences and Humanities. For most articles abstracts are freely available; access to the full text (in PDF and, for newer publications, also HTML) generally requires a subscription or pay-per-view purchase.


9. ScienceMag

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Science was a general science magazine published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). It was intended to “bridge the distance between science and citizen”, aimed at a technically literate audience who may not work professionally in the sciences. The AAAS also publishes the famous science journal Science, the similar name leading to some confusion.

Science was first issued as Science 80 in November 1979 and was originally published bi-monthly and by subscription only. The name of the magazine changed every year to reflect the publication date, becoming Science 81, Science 82, etc. This caused some consternation among librarians, who found it difficult to index. The magazine was similar to Discover in terms of coverage, but tended to offer longer articles and often a photoessay. Guest essays by a well-known scientist were a common feature as well. The magazine also offered a “Resources” section which contained references for the articles.

Like Discover, Science was aimed at readers looking for something more readable than the Scientific American of those days, which was a much more technical magazine than it became in the 1990s, but more in-depth and more artfully written than magazines like Popular Science, which tends to cover technology more than the science behind it. This market proved to be too small for the large number of magazines that attempted to serve it, and many disappeared during the mid-1980s. Science was purchased in 1986 by Time Inc. and folded into Discover, the last issue being July 1986. A few issues ofDiscover after the merger feature a stamp noting “Now including Science 86”, but this quickly disappeared. This claim was somewhat suspect, however, as all of the Science staff was immediately laid off after the takeover.


8. Understanding Science

understandingscience

The mission of Understanding Science is to provide a fun, accessible, and free resource that accurately communicates what science is and how it really works. The process of science is exciting, but standard explanations often miss its dynamic nature. Science affects us all everyday, but people often feel cut off from science. Science is an intensely human endeavor, but many portrayals gloss over the passion, curiosity, and even rivalries and pitfalls that characterize all human ventures. Understanding Science gives users an inside look at the general principles, methods, and motivations that underlie all of science.


7. National Geographic

national-geographic

The National Geographic Society has been inspiring people to care about the planet since 1888. It is one of the largest nonprofit scientific and educational institutions in the world. Its interests include geography, archaeology and natural science, and the promotion of environmental and historical conservation.

website url : http://www.nationalgeographic.com/


 

6. Public Library of Science

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PLOS (for Public Library of Science) is a nonprofit open access scientific publishing project aimed at creating a library of open access journals and other scientific literature under an open content license. It launched its first journal, PLOS Biology, in October 2003 and publishes seven journals, all peer reviewed, as of April 2012. The organization is based in San Francisco, California, and has a European editorial office in Cambridge, England.

URL : http://www.plos.org/

 


5. ScienceStage

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ScienceStage is a global, science-oriented multimedia portal that specializes in online video streaming, which is used to support communication between scientists, scholars, researchers in industry, and professionals. It is also used by academics and students as a virtual educational tool.[1] Video content ranges from conference recordings, to interviews, documentaries, webinars, and tutorials. ScienceStage, as its slogan suggests, also functions as a ‘hub’ by creating a meta-layer that enables the networking of both users (individuals and groups) and content (video, audio, and documents), which forms an integrated multimedia and social networking platform for scientists


 4. ScienceDaily

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Science Daily is an American news website for topical science articles. It features articles on a wide variety of science topics including: astronomy, exoplanets, computer science, nanotechnology, medicine, psychology,sociology, anthropology, biology, geology, climate, space, physics, mathematics, chemistry, archeology,paleontology, and others.

The website was founded in 1995 by science writer Dan Hogan. The articles are selected from news releases submitted by universities and other research institutions. Some articles are written by Science Daily staff. The site is updated once daily, although more new articles are added during a given weekday than on the weekend. Users can subscribe to a free daily newsletter distributed by email, which contains links to all articles for the day and a short introduction to each article.

In 2011, Quantcast listed it as a top 653 site with 2,000,000+ U.S. people visiting per month and this being 60% of all visitors


3. LiveScience

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LiveScience is a science news website run by Purch, which it purchased from Imaginova in 2009. Stories and editorial commentary are typically syndicated to major news outlets, such as Yahoo!, MSNBC, AOL, and Fox News.

LiveScience was originally launched in 2004, but was subsequently shut down and re-launched in 2007. LiveScience covers scientific breakthroughs, research ventures and odd facts from around the world in an online newsmagazine format.


 2. NASA

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The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is the United States government agency responsible for the civilian space program as well as aeronautics and aerospace research.President Dwight D. Eisenhower established the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in 1958 with a distinctly civilian (rather than military) orientation encouraging peaceful applications in space science. The National Aeronautics and Space Act was passed on July 29, 1958, disestablishing NASA’s predecessor, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The new agency became operational on October 1, 1958


 1. Discovery

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Discovery Channel (formerly The Discovery Channel from 1985 to 1995, and often referred to as simply “Discovery”) is an American basic cable and satellite television channel (which is also delivered via IPTV,terrestrial television and internet television in other parts of the world) that is the flagship television property ofDiscovery Communications, a publicly traded company run by CEO David Zaslav. As of June 2012, Discovery Channel is the third most widely distributed cable channel in the United States, behind TBS and The Weather Channel; it is available in 409 million households worldwide, through its U.S. flagship channel and its various owned or licensed television channels internationally.

 

Source: wikipedia